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INTERNAL COMBUSTION POWERED PLANES

THIS SECTION IS STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION

SUMMARY

XXX

 

Type of plane:

The range is large - and you are well advised to see these at the field and check out the magazines. I will not detail these but will concentrate on the beginner's needs.

Many a new flier has bought the most beautiful plane in the shop - which is well beyond his initial skills - with very sad results.

Type of plane for the beginner:

When you are learning to fly, you will need to be WELL off the ground so that you reduce the likelihood of crashing into it(!!). So, you will need something which is large enough to be well seen when it is flown at a fair height, but not so big that it is beyond you.

All this leads to a plane which has a span of about xxx metres.

Because they are more stable an forgiving, a plane with dihedral (bend) in the wing and no ailerons is preferred. Steering is by use of the rudder.

A model with ailerons is not as forgiving and will require more skill than the beginner can usually handle.

Flight Times

This will depend on your propulsion unit, quantity of fuel carried, weight, size and setup of the plane.

Flights over 10 minutes are not necessarily a good thing for beginners as the brain begins to curdle and the plane then becomes more likely to crash.

Internal combustion fliers will almost always time their flights so that they have fuel to spare when landing an internal combustion planes do not glide well without power.

Motor Size:

If the plane is underpowered its climb rate will be insufficient, and one false move on takeoff and it will hit the deck.

If the plane is overpowered, it will be too fast for you and you'll quickly lose control and crash.

The best size motor for a xxx metre span trainer is xxx.

The good news is that an xxx size motor can also be successfully used in a variety of subsequent planes as your flying abilities improve.

Construction:

Usually plywood and balsa, with hardwood spars.

Mentoring required to assist with building, installation of radio, balancing and trimming.

Covering:

Heat-shrink plastic covering such as Profilm, Solarfilm or Ozcover

Approximate cost of first plane and gear - from around A$XXX for the basics plus club fees.

A full table of ITEMS REQUIRED and APPROXIMATE PRICES
is contained in the
ADVANCED ARTICLE on this topic.

See link at the top or bottom of this page.

Buying ARF (Almost Ready to Fly) :

Many trainers available - various prices.

Buying Second Hand:

There are some bargains, but also some duds. Consult your mentor and KNOW what you need.

Radio Gear:

Multi-channel radio. Computer radio has advantages but is not essential.

Location requirements:

This MUST be done at a club field, unless you are fortunate enough to have access to a suitable property in the country.

Weather:

Calm days are essential for training. Aerobatic planes, when you get to them, can cope with more wind.

Degree of difficulty:

Will provide plenty of challenges. It is sometimes said that fliers of internal combustion engined models are better fliers than model glider pilots - because they have to be. Although it is a generalisation and I am not an internal combustion pilot - I have some sympathy with this view.

Comments:

Internal combustion planes have an excellent power to weight ratio, there are a lot of shops that provide the gear and support and plenty of people fly them.

However, because of their noise, there are often harsher restrictions on where and when they can be flown.

They are also generally messy, and If cleaning down oily planes before every trip home is not your scene, or if you can only keep them in the house, then go take a look at the electric alternatives. Many internal combustion fliers have change to electrics.

Moving on to other planes:

The range is huge! Check out the flying fields, shops, magazines and the net.

Further investigation:

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