( Uxbridge, County of Worcester )
Located in Central Massachusetts in the Blackstone River Valley

( UXBRIDGE - Was first settled in 1662 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ and Incorporated in 1727 )

 

The above loom is not from the Stanley Mill
but was taken from an old 1869 news article.

 

Situated in the heart of the Picturesque Blackstone River Valley can be found the Stanley Woolen Company
The Company was named after Stanley H. Wheelock who had helped his father to organize the new company
in 1905, the Wheelock family having run the mill ( 1883 - 1905 ) as the Calumet Woolen Company. The Stanley
Woolen Company was incorporated in 1905, being the first American mill to fully manufacture woolen garments
- mainly men's wear for the domestic market and to go on through the Great Depression and in later years to
produce cloth for famous names such as Pierre Cardin and many more, it was finally lost through bankruptcy
in 1989 and closed forever. Records and much other information has been transfered to Lowell for safe keeping
well before they were lost to time alone. The previous name was the Luke Taft mill, firstly organized back in 1833

The Mill is now on the way back to its Former Glory - - - in much the same manner as the Lowell Mills.


Below can be found seven different photos - All taken by

Wayne Hall Photography

Four are external shots of the building - just before renovation and
the remaining three catching some of the remains to what was once a bustling workplace.

It is hoped that they will serve as a lasting memory as to the decay of such a Famous
Woolen Mill due to time and weather alone taking its toll over the many years, waiting in silence for a new breath of Life.

 

A front view - although early days, one can notice a coat of paint with roofing completed.
The building to the left was the main office block for the mill for so many years, with the mill in the rear.

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The two photos below are also taken from the front capturing slightly different views.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long gone is the paint but the windows remain intact
as if they were waiting to be looked through once more.

 

 

 

 

As mentioned above the next three photos below have captured the remains of this busy place.

The water towers and old storage shed are no longer there due to the redevelopment
although the cypress wood used for the uprights has now been put to another use,
having been turned into hand made furniture by a talented craftsman and tenant.

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An old Cone Winding bin - it would have most likely have been used for discarded
empty cones during a production run and then taken to another room for rewinding.

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A solitary bronze roller - from one of the many machines can be seen lying in the
wool waste, another nostalgic reminder as to this Busy Mill of times long past.

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If you have enjoyed the above series of photos from the Stanley Mill, click the link below
to have a Good Look at other content from Wayne Hall Photography.
The Gallery page is a Must See for all of us!! - both young and old.

Wayne Hall Photography

Without the help of

Wayne Hall Photography

the History of this Marvelous New England Mill would not have been recorded in a digital form.


Last updated: November 4, 2010.

It is hoped within time to also feature some after images when all work is completed.
As well as giving a more defined history including B & W photos of days long gone.
One such photo is below, showing one of the looms and an operator from the 1980's, before the looms stopped in 1990 for the last time.

Stanley Mill in 1980

~ Above photo courtesy of Mr. Dan Malloy in Hopedale, MA ~
For people interested in the history of Hopedale, MA or a look at Hopedale today
click below

Hopedale History, Massachusetts


Below,
A look at the Stanley Mill as seen in the Winter of 1900, the cupola was a
common sight not only on textile mills but also on many factories of that era.

Stanley Mill in 1900





UXBRIDGE MILL LOCATIONS

1810 - 1990

Very worthy of note are the other Businesses and Mills that were around at this period and before
in Uxbridge, some include a Shuttle shop, Zadok's A. Tafts Warehouse and the Ironstone Mill.
Refer to map under the following listing for a Location Guide



Elmdale Mill, 1930's

( 1 ) J. R. & S. W. Scott Satinet Mills ( Site of First Woolen Mill in Uxbridge built in 1811 by Daniel Day, located
on Scott's Lane, Still there today! ) .................................................................................. Link - Click here
In 1810 Daniel Day built his first mill in Uxbridge; size, twenty by forty feet, two stories high, and located
where now stands the mill of S. W. Scott. In the same year he put into the mill a billy, a jenny with thirty
spindles and a hand-loom. In 1812 he added four looms, making five in all. Everything except the picking
and carding was then done by hand, and no looms were run by water-power, until a number of years after.




Elmdale Mill, 2007

Photo - Courtesy of Mr. Edward Harris.



W. D.Davis & Company, Uxbridge Woolen Mills

W. D. Davis & Company
Uxbridge Woolen Mfg Co
circa 1860

( 2 ) W. D. Davis & Company - Uxbridge Woolen Mills ............ ( Later to become Hecla and American Woolen )
This area of Uxbridge was known as Hecla ( Polish section of town ) Small signs still show that designation.
The Hecla Mill was bought by the Taft family in 1868 who made extensive repairs, improvements and additions,
previously known as the Uxbridge Woolen Mills. In 1884 the mill was bought by the Calumet Woolen Company
and the name changed to Hecla, by this time in the Wheelock ownership.


S. M. Wheelock

Above
S. M. Wheelock, long time owner of the Hecla Mill


In 1905 the Wheelocks sold the mill to the American Woolen Company, in 1928 part of the mill was sold to the Cherry
Valley Woolen Company and part also to Industrial Properties,Inc. of Quincy, MA. They in turn sold the building to
the Steacie Garneting Company who operated it for a short time. In 1931 & 1933 it was sold again and in 1940 it was bought
again by Industrial Properties. On the 28th of February, 1941 fire destroyed the main building bringing to an end the long
story of Hecla, and all the other names it went by.


Hecla Mill

Above
A small look inside the Hecla Mill showing part of the finishing floor on the left and a printing machine to the right.




C. A. & S. M. Wheelock Mills

C.A & S. M. Wheelock Mills
( Fancy Woolens )
circa 1860

( 3 ) C. A. & S. M. Wheelock - Fancy ( Cassimeres ) Woolens ......... ( Also known as Luke Taft Mill and in 1898
it was known as Calumet Woolen Mills. ) The area formed by the triangle created at the intersection of
Mendon Street and Henry Street, as well as the area north of that was known as Wheelockville. That area
is still designated as such by small signs. ......................................................................... Link - Click here

Waucantuck Mill

In 1824 the dam was errected for the Lake Taft Mill and the mill built in 1825. In 1883 the company was known
as Luke Taft and son, previous to this back in 1837 it was named the East River Manufucturing Company as the
Tafts brought in Caleb T. Chapin into partnership. Late in 1837 Jerry and C A. Wheelock rented one half of the
mill, and the Tafts operated the other. In 1846 Moses Taft sold his half to the Wheelocks, and the firm of C. A.
& S. M. Wheelock gave the name Waucantuck to the mill. The Wheelocks sold the mill to C. A. Root and Louis
Bachmann in 1900, and in 1923 it was sold again. In 1961 it was sold to J.S.B. Yarns Inc. The mill stood as a
reminder of times gone by up until 2008 when it was raised.





Capron & Haywood Satinet Mills

Capron & Haywood Satinet Mills
circa 1860

( 4 ) Capron & Haywood Satinet Mills .............................. ( Also known as Capron Mill; last owner was Bernat )
In 1820 the Capron Mill was built, thirty-three by sixty feet, and three stories high, and went into operation
in the winter of 1821-22. It was started with one set of cards, one billy of forty spindles, two jennies of one
hundred and twenty spindles each, two cotton-spinning-frames of sixty-four spindles each, with the prepar-
ations, and a warper and dresser for making satinet warps, and twelve power satinet-looms, the first satinet
power-looms ever built, built on the premises by Luke Jillson, of Cumberland, R.I. In 1824 an addition was
made of a set of cards, a billy of fifty spindles and a jenny of one hundred and twenty spindles, built by the
Messrs. Carpenter ; a jenny of one hundred and fifty spindles, built by Jerry Wheelock ; eight satinet-looms,
two cotton-cards and two spinning-frames of sixty-four spindles each, built in Woonsocket. In 1837 & 1855
the mill saw many changes in the way of building additions, but it remained the first mill to ever produce
satinets with purposely built power looms.



Capron/Bernat Mill

Photo - Courtesy of Mr. Edward Harris.



( 5 ) Charles C. Capron Shoddy Mills ............................................................................................ ( Yarn Mill )



( 6 ) Henry Capron Saw Mill ............................................................................................................................





J.Whitin's Mill

James Whitin's Cotton Mills
circa 1860

( 7 ) James F. Whitin's Cotton Mill ........................ ( Also known as The Crown and Eagle Mills ), Originally two
separate mills later joined together in the middle. The Blackstone river still flows under it on the left hand
side as you face what would have been the front of the mill. The Blackstone Canal flowed through on the
right hand side and still exists. The mill on the right was known as the " Crown Mill ", built between 1823 -
1825 and on the left the " Eagle Mill ", built in 1830, both built by Robert Rogerson. The building in the
middle was built in 1851 by James Whitin, the property consisting of two hundred acres. With the addition
in 1851 the mill measured three hundred and twenty feet long and three stories high, with attics and basements
to the stone mill. New and improved machinery was put into the mill, and everything was done to make it a
first-class mill of about ten thousand spindles.



Crown & Eagle Mill

Photo - Courtesy of Mr. Edward Harris.

Click here to see how the two buildings looked before the middle building was added, the machine shop is
shown off to the right in this early print. The tower on the Crown Mill existed up until 1966, but by 1972 the
tower was in great need of repair, along with much of the main buildings. The mills had closed during the
1920's after being bought by the Whitin family of Northbridge ( Whitinsville ) in 1841 and run under the
name of the Uxbridge Cotton Mills, the mills sat inactive for many years until a fire swept through the
buildings in 1975. The mills were rebuilt and were converted into senior housing.

Thanks to the marvelous photography of Randolph Langenbach in the above links.




Sayles & Taft Mills

Sayles & Taft Woolen Mills
circa 1860

( 8 ) Sayles & Taft Woolen Mills ......................................................................................................................





Sayles & Taft Mills

Daniel W. Taft Mill
Stanley Woolen Mill
circa 1860

( 9 ) Daniel Taft Mill .......................... ( Also known as Central Mill & Stanley Woolen ) This area was known as
Centerville and small signs still mark the area as such.





( 10 ) Alvin Cook Mill ....... In 1834 Alvin Cook bought a small building on Emerson Brook in the western part of
town, now Pond Street. This building had originally been a cabinet maker's shop. Alvin Cook organized
for a carding dept to be put in for woolens, a number of spinning machines and looms but no finishing
equipment. He ran the mill by the yard for Effingham L. Capron who was at this time running the well
known Capron Mill manufacturing satinets.





( 11 ) Zadok A. Taft's Warehouse .....................................................................................................................



( 12 ) Zadok A. Taft Mill .................................................................................................................................





( 13 ) Ironstone Mill .........................................................................................................................................
Cotton manufacturing kept pace with woolens, and in 1814 the Ironstone Mill was built on Forge Brook
( later to be known as Ironstone Brook ), in the south part of the town, by William Arnold and associates.
In 1832, the mill was burned and later rebuilt by Jonathan F. Southwick who fitted the mill with woolen
machinery, and operated by Fairbanks & Messinger for the manufacture of Kentucky jeans. The Ironstone
district became home to woolen and cloth mills as well as its own school and post office. The mill takes
its name from the peculiar appearance of the stone of which it is built, indicating the presence of iron in it.

Thanks to the Blackstonedaily dot com for the above link




( 14 ) Shuttle Shop ................................................................................................................. Link - Click here
In 1814, John and George Carpenter built a small factory to manufacture billies and spinning Jennies,
the pond seen in the above link was later to be known as Shuttle Shop Pond. The shuttle shop was
powered by a waterwheel. The water coming from Drabble Tail Brook which is formed by the union
of Croney Brook and Shuttle Brook, two smaller streams, or rivulets, arising from springs in the hills,
just westerly of the centre of town, the outlet downstream being the Mumford River. The Shuttle Shop
was located on Carney Street.



( 15 ) Rivulet Manufacturing Company ................................................................................... Link - Click here
The Rivulet Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1816, although the company was formed,
the building erected, and the business of manufacturing began in 1814. The company uses a billy and
spinning jennies, which were built by John and George Carpenter, (above) the mill being superintended
by Jerry Wheelock who was a practical mechanic, well acquainted with the construction and operation
of machinery. The weaving was all done by hand looms, and the goods were chiefly satinets, although
some broadcloth and cassimeres were made. The company consisted of Samuel Read, Alpheus Baylies,
John Capron, Daniel Carpenter, Jerry Wheelock, George Carpenter, Joseph H. Perry, Luther Spring,
Ezbon C. Newell, Samuel Judson and Amherst Billings. It was formed March 14th, 1815, with a capital
of fourteen thousand five hundred dollars.




( 16 ) R. G. Taft Woolen ........................................................................ ( Appears to have been a smaller mill )




For all locations see Map below

Uxbridge Map

Many thanks to Mr. Edward Harris for the Listing, Map and photos above & below, through a major study of an area he
knows so well, it is now possible to look back in time to the complete Textile era as it was in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.





Transport of the early 1900's in Uxbridge, MA.


Uxbridge Trolley 1

Above ~
A Worcester Consolidated Street Railway car traveling through the center of Uxbridge on the way to Woonsocket, RI.

Uxbridge and Blackstone Valley Street Railway Company.
Period of Operation: 1902 - 1909.
This street railway eventually became the Worcester and Blackstone Valley Street Railway Company.

Worcester and Blackstone Valley Street Railway Company
Period of Operation: 1909 - May, 1911.
Then named the Worcester Consolidated Street Railway in 1911.

The operations covered Uxbridge, North Uxbridge, Millville, Blackstone and Woonsocket, RI.

The Milford & Uxbridge Street Railway Company is another line not to be left out - Link Click here

The Milford & Uxbridge Street Railway Company First trip

Thanks to Dan Malloy's - History of Hopedale, Massachusetts - for the above links.

Below ~
On the right a Milford & Uxbridge Street Railway car and on the left a Worcester
Consolidated Street Railway car, note the small Railroad Bridge to the left which exists today.

Uxbridge Trolley 2

Below ~
End of the line for a trolley in Uxbridge

Uxbridge Trolley 2

For all those people who are interested in the trolleys from this area, some good photos and a well written history are on the following site
Click here
Thanks to Dan Malloy in Hopedale, Massachusetts., for the above link and the good photos...




 

 



Thanks to the Blackstone daily dot com
for a good story about the Stanley Mill, written by Carol Masiello
Click Here for the story





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